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Russet-winged Schiffornis (Schiffornis stenorhyncha)

Russet-winged Schiffornis is one of five species that formerly were united under the name Thrush-like Schiffornis (Schiffornis turdina); the other members of this group are Northern Schiffornis (S. veraepacis), Olivaceous Schiffornis (S. olivacea), Foothill Schiffornis (S. aenea), and Brown-winged Schiffornis (S. turdina). 

Russet-winged Schiffornis is a representative of this group that occurs from central Panama east across northern Colombia to western and northern Venezuela. All species in this group have similar, dull plumages, being primarily brown or olive brown, with paler underparts, and prominent large dark eyes. Although all members of the group also are poorly known, Russet-winged Schiffornis probably is one of the least studied members of the complex. This is a relatively low density species that occupies the understory of terra firme forests, most often foraging within 1-2 m of the ground, and typically is solitary. The clear whistled song is heard far more often than th…

Featured Species: Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

The Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus) is a species of bird in the woodcreeper family. It's widespread, and is distributed from Panama south through central South America and to northeastern Brazil, found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela.

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests,  scrub, riparian forest, and heavily degraded former forest.



Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

It has a very straight pale colored bill that can even look slightly upturned unlike most other woodcreepers. Otherwise, mostly dark brown with fine streaking on the head and breast, but unstreaked back. Usually seen singly or in pairs working up tree trunks and branches, usually at lower to middle levels.



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