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Limosa Harlequin Frog (Atelopus limosus)

This species of endangered toad is endemic to Panama and is found on the banks of streams in humid lowland tropical forests and rivers of the Chagres basin in central Panama. It belongs to the toads’ family, and its scientific name is Atelopus limosus. It has two color forms, being more striking the one of higher lands which is green and yellow with black or dark brown chevrons.

This toad is threatened by habitat loss and chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease that affects amphibians, caused by a fungus. This disease is so serious that the dramatic decline in amphibian populations is attributed to it, and it is considered that it can lead to the extinction of these populations. Amphibians are important to ecosystems because they are environmental indicators and insect controllers. Little is known about the diet of this toad, but it is likely that they feed on beetles, ants, flies and mites. This species is diurnal and is typically found on the slopes and on the shores of narrow rock…

Featured Species: Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

The Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus) is a species of bird in the woodcreeper family. It's widespread, and is distributed from Panama south through central South America and to northeastern Brazil, found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela.

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests,  scrub, riparian forest, and heavily degraded former forest.



Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

It has a very straight pale colored bill that can even look slightly upturned unlike most other woodcreepers. Otherwise, mostly dark brown with fine streaking on the head and breast, but unstreaked back. Usually seen singly or in pairs working up tree trunks and branches, usually at lower to middle levels.



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