Skip to main content

Featured

Nine-banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)

The nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) is a species of mammal related to the anteaters and sloths that can be found from the South of the United States to the North of Argentina. It is found in grasslands, tropical forests and a wide variety of dryland habitats. Although it seems more common in humid areas, where they excavate the earth to create burrows with their legs that have claws. It has an armored body and despite its short legs, it moves very quickly.
It is an animal of mainly nocturnal habits, very elusive and timid; it is guided by smell, and also by the acute sense of hearing. During the day they usually stay in their burrows, and in the evenings, they venture into open fields to hunt insects and larvae. It is an insectivorous animal, feeding mainly with ants and termites. However, it also feeds on other small insects and invertebrates such as worms and snails, tuberous roots and small amphibians. Due to being hunted for its meat and shell, and due to destruction o…

Featured Species: Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

The Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum) is a very small passerine bird in the tyrant flycatcher family common and widespread species of secondary forest and forest edge; it is distributed from southern Mexico to south to northeastern Argentina, but is absent from much of the Amazon Basin.
Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatchers have glossy black forecrowns, slate gray hindcrowns, olive upperparts, black wings and bright yellow underparts; the iris usually is yellow, and with a long, flattened, straight black bill.



Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatchers forage in dense vegetation close to the ground or in the open mid-level canopy of trees. It's usually seen in pairs, making rapid dashing sallies or hovering to pick small arthropods off the vegetation.

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)



Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Like other species of tody-tyrant, the Common Tody-Flycatcher builds a hanging pouch shaped nest 1 to 5 m off the ground made out of plant material and bound with spiderweb.

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

It is a very common inhabitant in gardens, shady plantations, second growth and the edges and clearings of forest, although it avoids the dense interior of mature woodland and also arid areas. It often wags its tail as it moves sideways along branches.

Comments

Popular Posts