Skip to main content

Featured

Limosa Harlequin Frog (Atelopus limosus)

This species of endangered toad is endemic to Panama and is found on the banks of streams in humid lowland tropical forests and rivers of the Chagres basin in central Panama. It belongs to the toads’ family, and its scientific name is Atelopus limosus. It has two color forms, being more striking the one of higher lands which is green and yellow with black or dark brown chevrons.

This toad is threatened by habitat loss and chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease that affects amphibians, caused by a fungus. This disease is so serious that the dramatic decline in amphibian populations is attributed to it, and it is considered that it can lead to the extinction of these populations. Amphibians are important to ecosystems because they are environmental indicators and insect controllers. Little is known about the diet of this toad, but it is likely that they feed on beetles, ants, flies and mites. This species is diurnal and is typically found on the slopes and on the shores of narrow rock…

Featured Species: Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

The Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum) is a very small passerine bird in the tyrant flycatcher family common and widespread species of secondary forest and forest edge; it is distributed from southern Mexico to south to northeastern Argentina, but is absent from much of the Amazon Basin.
Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatchers have glossy black forecrowns, slate gray hindcrowns, olive upperparts, black wings and bright yellow underparts; the iris usually is yellow, and with a long, flattened, straight black bill.



Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatchers forage in dense vegetation close to the ground or in the open mid-level canopy of trees. It's usually seen in pairs, making rapid dashing sallies or hovering to pick small arthropods off the vegetation.

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)



Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

Like other species of tody-tyrant, the Common Tody-Flycatcher builds a hanging pouch shaped nest 1 to 5 m off the ground made out of plant material and bound with spiderweb.

Common Tody-Flycatcher (Todirostrum cinereum)

It is a very common inhabitant in gardens, shady plantations, second growth and the edges and clearings of forest, although it avoids the dense interior of mature woodland and also arid areas. It often wags its tail as it moves sideways along branches.

Popular Posts