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Russet-winged Schiffornis (Schiffornis stenorhyncha)

Russet-winged Schiffornis is one of five species that formerly were united under the name Thrush-like Schiffornis (Schiffornis turdina); the other members of this group are Northern Schiffornis (S. veraepacis), Olivaceous Schiffornis (S. olivacea), Foothill Schiffornis (S. aenea), and Brown-winged Schiffornis (S. turdina). 

Russet-winged Schiffornis is a representative of this group that occurs from central Panama east across northern Colombia to western and northern Venezuela. All species in this group have similar, dull plumages, being primarily brown or olive brown, with paler underparts, and prominent large dark eyes. Although all members of the group also are poorly known, Russet-winged Schiffornis probably is one of the least studied members of the complex. This is a relatively low density species that occupies the understory of terra firme forests, most often foraging within 1-2 m of the ground, and typically is solitary. The clear whistled song is heard far more often than th…

Limosa Harlequin Frog (Atelopus limosus)


Limosa Harlequin Frog (Atelopus limosus)

This species of endangered toad is endemic to Panama and is found on the banks of streams in humid lowland tropical forests and rivers of the Chagres basin in central Panama. It belongs to the toads’ family, and its scientific name is Atelopus limosus. It has two color forms, being more striking the one of higher lands which is green and yellow with black or dark brown chevrons.

Limosa Harlequin Frog (Atelopus limosus)

This toad is threatened by habitat loss and chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease that affects amphibians, caused by a fungus. This disease is so serious that the dramatic decline in amphibian populations is attributed to it, and it is considered that it can lead to the extinction of these populations. Amphibians are important to ecosystems because they are environmental indicators and insect controllers. Little is known about the diet of this toad, but it is likely that they feed on beetles, ants, flies and mites. This species is diurnal and is typically found on the slopes and on the shores of narrow rocky streams in primary forests.

The silt in its habitat matches the color of the toads; thus, they are inconspicuous on this surface.

Scientists from different parts of the world join efforts to find the cure of the fungus in amphibians and in Panama several rescue, conservation and reproduction projects of this and other amphibian species are carried out.

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