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Nine-banded Armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus)

The nine-banded armadillo (Dasypus novemcinctus) is a species of mammal related to the anteaters and sloths that can be found from the South of the United States to the North of Argentina. It is found in grasslands, tropical forests and a wide variety of dryland habitats. Although it seems more common in humid areas, where they excavate the earth to create burrows with their legs that have claws. It has an armored body and despite its short legs, it moves very quickly.
It is an animal of mainly nocturnal habits, very elusive and timid; it is guided by smell, and also by the acute sense of hearing. During the day they usually stay in their burrows, and in the evenings, they venture into open fields to hunt insects and larvae. It is an insectivorous animal, feeding mainly with ants and termites. However, it also feeds on other small insects and invertebrates such as worms and snails, tuberous roots and small amphibians. Due to being hunted for its meat and shell, and due to destruction o…

Featured Species: Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)


Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

The Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) is a species of rodent that is found from southern Mexico and Central America to northern Argentina, mainly in Woods and forested areas, at less than 6,500 feet altitude. Usually, they are shy animals and run away from humans, and could be very fast runners. Adults live in monogamous couples for life.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

They are usually diurnal and are hidden at night in hollow trunks or in burrows between the roots. In the day they are very active and elegant in their movements, giving a kind of trot or a series of jumps that look like a gallop.



Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

They eat mostly fruits and seeds, as well as leaves and roots. They bury seeds in their territory and in times of scarcity of food they depend on those buried seeds. Many of these seeds are forgotten, which helps in the proliferation of various types of trees and shrubs, so they are known as important seed dispersers. They have also been seen eating eggs from birds that nest in the ground and even other sources of animal protein.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

Some populations have been reduced due to hunting and deforestation, which can make it difficult to observe them in certain places. However, large populations remain and it is not considered threatened.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) when feeding, sit on their hind legs and hold the food between their front legs.


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