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Featured Species: Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus)

The Straight-billed Woodcreeper (Dendroplex picus) is a species of bird in the woodcreeper family. It's widespread, and is distributed from Panama south through central South America and to northeastern Brazil, found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Panama, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela.

Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical dry forests, subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical mangrove forests,  scrub, riparian forest, and heavily degraded former forest.





It has a very straight pale colored bill that can even look slightly upturned unlike most other woodcreepers. Otherwise, mostly dark brown with fine streaking on the head and breast, but unstreaked back. Usually seen singly or in pairs working up tree trunks and branches, usually at lower to middle levels.


Featured Species: Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)


Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

The Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) is a species of rodent that is found from southern Mexico and Central America to northern Argentina, mainly in Woods and forested areas, at less than 6,500 feet altitude. Usually, they are shy animals and run away from humans, and could be very fast runners. Adults live in monogamous couples for life.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

They are usually diurnal and are hidden at night in hollow trunks or in burrows between the roots. In the day they are very active and elegant in their movements, giving a kind of trot or a series of jumps that look like a gallop.



Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

They eat mostly fruits and seeds, as well as leaves and roots. They bury seeds in their territory and in times of scarcity of food they depend on those buried seeds. Many of these seeds are forgotten, which helps in the proliferation of various types of trees and shrubs, so they are known as important seed dispersers. They have also been seen eating eggs from birds that nest in the ground and even other sources of animal protein.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

Some populations have been reduced due to hunting and deforestation, which can make it difficult to observe them in certain places. However, large populations remain and it is not considered threatened.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) when feeding, sit on their hind legs and hold the food between their front legs.


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