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Russet-winged Schiffornis (Schiffornis stenorhyncha)

Russet-winged Schiffornis is one of five species that formerly were united under the name Thrush-like Schiffornis (Schiffornis turdina); the other members of this group are Northern Schiffornis (S. veraepacis), Olivaceous Schiffornis (S. olivacea), Foothill Schiffornis (S. aenea), and Brown-winged Schiffornis (S. turdina). 

Russet-winged Schiffornis is a representative of this group that occurs from central Panama east across northern Colombia to western and northern Venezuela. All species in this group have similar, dull plumages, being primarily brown or olive brown, with paler underparts, and prominent large dark eyes. Although all members of the group also are poorly known, Russet-winged Schiffornis probably is one of the least studied members of the complex. This is a relatively low density species that occupies the understory of terra firme forests, most often foraging within 1-2 m of the ground, and typically is solitary. The clear whistled song is heard far more often than th…

Featured Species: Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)


Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

The Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) is a species of rodent that is found from southern Mexico and Central America to northern Argentina, mainly in Woods and forested areas, at less than 6,500 feet altitude. Usually, they are shy animals and run away from humans, and could be very fast runners. Adults live in monogamous couples for life.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

They are usually diurnal and are hidden at night in hollow trunks or in burrows between the roots. In the day they are very active and elegant in their movements, giving a kind of trot or a series of jumps that look like a gallop.



Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

They eat mostly fruits and seeds, as well as leaves and roots. They bury seeds in their territory and in times of scarcity of food they depend on those buried seeds. Many of these seeds are forgotten, which helps in the proliferation of various types of trees and shrubs, so they are known as important seed dispersers. They have also been seen eating eggs from birds that nest in the ground and even other sources of animal protein.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata)

Some populations have been reduced due to hunting and deforestation, which can make it difficult to observe them in certain places. However, large populations remain and it is not considered threatened.

Central American Agouti (Dasyprocta punctata) when feeding, sit on their hind legs and hold the food between their front legs.


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