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Russet-winged Schiffornis (Schiffornis stenorhyncha)

Russet-winged Schiffornis is one of five species that formerly were united under the name Thrush-like Schiffornis (Schiffornis turdina); the other members of this group are Northern Schiffornis (S. veraepacis), Olivaceous Schiffornis (S. olivacea), Foothill Schiffornis (S. aenea), and Brown-winged Schiffornis (S. turdina). 

Russet-winged Schiffornis is a representative of this group that occurs from central Panama east across northern Colombia to western and northern Venezuela. All species in this group have similar, dull plumages, being primarily brown or olive brown, with paler underparts, and prominent large dark eyes. Although all members of the group also are poorly known, Russet-winged Schiffornis probably is one of the least studied members of the complex. This is a relatively low density species that occupies the understory of terra firme forests, most often foraging within 1-2 m of the ground, and typically is solitary. The clear whistled song is heard far more often than th…

Featured Species: Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis)

Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - male

The Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) is a species of bird in the Pipridae family, occurs from southeast Mexico south through Central America to Panama, and then along the Pacific slope of South America to northwest Ecuador. There are several species of 'red-headed' Pipra manakins, but this is the only that occurs in Central America, or in South America west of the Andes. It is small, measuring 10 cm (4 in) in length. The male is velvety black with a bright red head and nape, bright yellow thighs, and a pale yellow chin and wing linings, and white irides. It inhabits humid evergreen and semideciduous forests, as well as tall second growth and even thickets, occasionally visiting forest borders, clearings, and even scrubby areas, especially to forage at fruiting trees.


Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - female

Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - female

The female is olive green above, with paler, more yellow-green underparts. Both sexes have dull brown legs, and brown irides. While the adult male is distinctive, the female and youngsters can be confused with several similar species, as the female golden-collared manakin (which is larger, and has orange legs), and the female blue-crowned manakin (which is a brighter green).




Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - male

Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - male

It’s found primarily in humid forest and second growth woodland, typically below 400–500 m (1,300–1,600 ft) above sea level, though it sometimes ranges as high as 900 m (3,000 ft). Most are resident, but some individuals are known to migrate to take advantage of changing food resources.


Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - female

Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - male

The Red-capped Manakin is a frugivore but has also been observed plucking insects from the foliage and eating them. They also have been reported to forage following army ants, which allow them to seize insects that are trying to get away. It perches alone and quiet, and make sudden flights to capture its food. It catch fruits in flight, or if possible directly from the perch. Insects are usually caught in flight. Generally forages in the midstory of forest.


Red-capped Manakin (Ceratopipra mentalis) - female building nest

Red-capped Manakins breed from February to July in Panama. The nest is a small cup suspended in a fork from 1.5-9 m (4.9-29.5 ft) above the ground. It is constructed of plant fibers woven with black fungal filaments; externally has a variable number of pieces of dry leaves, and is attached to the fork with spider web. The clutch size is 2 eggs. Only the female builds the nest, incubates the eggs and provisions the nestlings.

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